Formerly the Municipal Technical College

Former Municipal Technical College | Photo by Tony Mould
Former Municipal Technical College
Photo by Tony Mould

Please note that this text is an extract from a reference work written in 1990.  As a result, some of the content may not reflect recent research, changes and events.

Brighton College of Technology, formerly the Technical College, has its origins in the Brighton School of Art and Science which opened, as an art school only, in the great kitchen of the Royal Pavilion in 1858. In 1874 it was joined there by a new science department, but the whole school moved to a new Italianate building by John Gibbins at Grand Parade in 1876. The corporation took control of the school in 1892, and removed the science department in 1897 to a new, Renaissance-style, red-brick and terracotta building at Richmond Terrace which was formally opened as the Municipal Technical College by Princess Louise and the Duke of Fife on 8 January 1898. The new college was enlarged in 1906 by the addition of a mechanical workshop, and the adjoining teachers-training premises, which had been erected in 1909, were incorporated as a north wing in 1927. The south wing was added in 1935.
In the late 1960s the Technical College took over the York Place Schools, and a new eleven-storey block was opened at Pelham Street in January 1971. In 1984 the Technical College was renamed Brighton College of Technology. There are annexes at Francis Street, Hanover Terrace , Preston Road , Stanmer Park , and at School Road in Hove , and in 1989 there were about 1,400 full-time and 7,500 part-time students.

Any numerical cross-references in the text above refer to resources in the Sources and Bibliography section of the Encyclopaedia of Brighton by Tim Carder.

The following resource(s) is quoted as a general source for the information above: 26,83,115,123

Updated information:

Brighton College of Technology has been known as City College Brighton
and Hove since 2001.

Situated in the heart of Brighton, City College Brighton and Hove has
become an international centre of vocational excellence. Every year
2,000 full-time, 10,000 part time, over 500 Higher Education and 250
14-16 year old students as well as many international and European
students choose City College as their place of further and higher
education training. In addition, the College provides training to over
2,000 businesses via its ‘City Business Skills’ department which
focuses on employer training needs. Offering over 700 courses from basic
level right through to business and postgraduate training, City College
is working with its partners to develop the workforce of the future.

Comments about this page

  • In the 60s I attended Brighton Technical College hairdressing dept which was an annexe situated in Lewes Road near the Barracks. There was another group of classes held there, don’t remember what it was, but the hairdressing classes were only opened in 1964/65 and there were only a few of us in the first years intake. If anyone has any information on this please let me know.

    By Anne Gee (07/03/2010)
  • I would have been at Brighton Tech from around 1975 for a few years (science lab tech. cert, ONC, HNC). The only students / staff I can remember from those times are Charles R, and Prof. M., John H. – have not included full names for their privacy. Do look me up on facebook if you were there or at A.H.Cox around that time. Fond memories.

    By Simon Bastians (11/12/2014)
  • I am from Malaysia and had attended Brighton Technical College from 1973 till 1975. Studied for the OND Electrical Engineering. Our lectures were mainly in Richmond Terrace and York Place. For workshop practices it was at School Road Training Centre and Preston Rd annexes

    By Said A Rahman (19/06/2017)
  • I started hairdressing in 1968 at the Lewes Road dept before going onto Pelham street. I did day release 9 am until 9pm. We had lessons in wigmaking, art, science and hygiene and even English.

    In the evening we had models to practise on. I passed the city and guilds and both hairdressing council provisional and qualification exams. I enjoyed those 3 years and remember some of the class, Rita I still see regularly. We used to often go to the Bosun pub in West Street at lunchtime. I remember making a postiche which took 3 years only to be told by the examiner that it resembled a dead cat!  Where have all those years gone?

     

    By Marian (03/10/2018)

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