Bond Street to Frederick Gardens

Please note that this text is an extract from a reference work written in 1990.  As a result, some of the content may not reflect recent research, changes and events.

a) BOND STREET : Developed in the second half of the eighteenth century, Bond Street was the first road built northwards from North Street . The town commissioners renamed it New Street in May 1794, but it reverted to its original name when the New Road opened nearby in 1805.
Now a busy shopping street, there are a number of buildings of interest and several are faced with mathematical tiles. Nos.2-3, plain brick buildings, and nos.4-7, grander buildings with bows, date from the early nineteenth century and are all listed. No.27 was the Wheatsheaf Inn from the mid eighteenth century until 1970. Nos.35-38 are small, eighteenth-century cottages with no.35 converted into the stage door of the Theatre Royal in 1894. No.42 Bond Street stands on the site of the Salem Baptist Chapel, built in 1787 and enlarged in 1825 to hold 800 worshippers. It was completely rebuilt in 1861 by Thomas Simpson with a Doric entrance and gable, but was demolished in 1974. {14,15,44,62,112,123,235}

b) BLENHEIM PLACE: Has an attractive row of gaily painted cottages of the 1840s. On the southern side is a former flint and brick malt-house of the North Street Brewery. {83,275}

c) CHELTENHAM PLACE: An attractive street of small terraced cottages of the 1840s. On the eastern side is the frontage of the former malt-house of the North Street Brewery.

d) FREDERICK GARDENS : A narrow twitten, lined with very small but attractive bow-windowed cottages of the 1820s behind tiny gardens. They are, unfortunately, completely overshadowed by the Post Office sorting office.

Any numerical cross-references in the text above refer to resources in the Sources and Bibliography section of the Encyclopaedia of Brighton by Tim Carder.

Comments about this page

  • Has anyone got a photo of the chapel? I know it was demolished in 1974. My ancestor George Webb was Deacon of this chapel.

    By Trish Gage (27/06/2010)
  • I used to frequent a small pub in the 60s on the corner of Cheltenham Place and North Road. I remember that it had a green tiled frontage. Later it was turned into a piano shop. I just can’t remember the name of this little pub. Could anyone tell me, please? Many thanks in advance.

    By Paul Hilton (02/07/2010)

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