Church Schools

The Church of St John the Baptist on Bristol Road. When consecrated on 9 July 1835 it was only the fourth Roman Catholic church to be built in England since the Reformation. Inside lies the tomb, designed by John Carew, of Maria Fitzherbert who was buried here on 6 April 1837. Next to the church is St. Joseph's Convent of Mercy, which is now a home for older people run by the Sisters of Mercy. | Image reproduced with kind permission from Brighton and Hove in Pictures by Brighton and Hove City Council
The Church of St John the Baptist on Bristol Road. When consecrated on 9 July 1835 it was only the fourth Roman Catholic church to be built in England since the Reformation. Inside lies the tomb, designed by John Carew, of Maria Fitzherbert who was buried here on 6 April 1837. Next to the church is St. Joseph's Convent of Mercy, which is now a home for older people run by the Sisters of Mercy.
Image reproduced with kind permission from Brighton and Hove in Pictures by Brighton and Hove City Council

Please note that this text is an extract from a reference work written in 1990.  As a result, some of the content may not reflect recent research, changes and events.

b) CHURCH SCHOOLS: Many churches also established elementary day schools for poor children in addition to Sunday schools. These included Belgrave Street Chapel (1863); Christ Church, Bedford Place (1841); St Bartholomew, Providence Place (1872); St John, Carlton Hill (1870); St John the Baptist (1907 Upper Bedford Street, 1989 Whitehawk Hill Road); St Mark (1845 Sussex Square, 1856 Chesham Road, 1896 Arundel Road, 1972 and 1982 Manor Road); St Martin (1875 St Martin’s Street, 1987 Hartington Road); St Mary Magdalene (1871 Upper North Street, 1970 Hampton Street); St Paul (1877 Little Russell Street, 1924 Russell Place, 1967 St Nicholas Road); and St Stephen, Borough Street (1855). {83,123}

Any numerical cross-references in the text above refer to resources in the Sources and Bibliography section of the Encyclopaedia of Brighton by Tim Carder.

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