A famous Rottingdean resident

Blue plaque on Prospect Cottage, Rottingdean | Photo by Tony Mould
Blue plaque on Prospect Cottage, Rottingdean
Photo by Tony Mould
Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898) photographed by Frederick Hollyer (1837-1933).  Original, taken in 1890 is in the Victoria and Albert Museum
Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898) photographed by Frederick Hollyer (1837-1933). Original, taken in 1890 is in the Victoria and Albert Museum
Prospect Cottage, Rottingdean | Photo by Tony Mould
Prospect Cottage, Rottingdean
Photo by Tony Mould

Edward Burne-Jones (1833-1898) was one of the foremost artists of his day, and a high profile member of the Pre-Raphaelite brotherhood of artists prominent in the 1870s. When he was a student at Oxford he met William Morris and the two had a lifelong friendship.  After discovering the writings of John Ruskin, they decided to devote their lives to art.  Burne-Jones painted in oils and many of his paintings had literary allusions.  He also produced tapestries, stained glass, tiles and mosaics.  With William Morris he set up the very successful furnishing company Morris, Marshall, Faulkner and Co.

His work today can be seen in many local galleries and local churches including St. Paul’s in West Street,  the Church of the Annunciation in Washington Street, St Michael and All Angels, Victoria Road, and at St Margaret’s in Rottingdean.  He lived for many years in Prospect Cottage, and Aubrey Cottage in Rottingdean. The present Prospect Cottage was, in Burne-Jone’s time, Prospect House. A staunch traditionalist, Burne-Jones was unhappy with efforts to modernise Rottingdean.  He was particularly unhappy about the intrusion of Magnus Volk’s Daddy Long Legs railway.  When the railway was smashed in a great storm, Burne-Jones was reported to be very pleased.

No Comments

Start the ball rolling by posting a comment on this page!

Add a comment about this page

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *